Tag Heuer Replica Longines Avigation Watch Type A-7

No, that’s not a typo… the name of Longines’s newest pilot-inspired timepiece is apparently an amalgam of “aviation” and “navigation.” It’s a fitting name for a very unconventional watch, one whose large-cased, angled-dial design is based on aviators’ watches from the early 20th century.

The Longines Avigation Watch Type A-7’s retro look is based on high quality replica watches developed by Longines during the 1930s for military aviators. The United States Army established strict standards of precision, quality and legibility that watches had to meet before being accepted for military use. The Longines watches that met this criteria were classified “Type A-7″; Longines has resurrected the moniker for this watch. Like these 1930s models, the new Avigation Watch has its dial angled 50 degrees to the right, ensuring that it could be quickly and easily read by a pilot, who typically wore it on the inside of his wrist. The tilted angle ensured the dial was aligned with the aircraft’s instrument panel and the pilot could read it without moving his arm or letting go of the controls. (Click on the photos to enlarge images.)

Longines Avigation Watch Type A-7 side

Longines Avigation Watch Type A-7 angle

The large, stainless-steel case (49 mm in diameter) and spacious black dial with large, white, Arabic numerals are also intended to aid in legibility, particularly for a pilot dealing with low light or turbulence. The big, fluted crown makes it easy to operate the watch, even if you happen to be wearing thick aviator’s gloves. The dial also has a tachymeter scale around its outer edge. Classic Breguet hour and minute hands add another vintage touch.

The watch contains Caliber L788, a column-wheel chronograph movement developed exclusively for Longines by ETA, its sister company in the Swatch Group. The Avigation Type A-7 features a single-pushpiece chronograph whose start, stop,  and return-to-zero functions are all controlled by pushing the single push-button set into the crown. The movement is visible through a sapphire exhibition caseback, which is protected by a hinged caseback cover. The top quality replica watch is mounted on a black alligator leather strap. Its price: $4,900.

Click here for more historically inspired watches from Longines, which celebrates its 180th anniversary this year.

Longines Avigation Watch Type A-7 front

Watch Insider Presents Eight New Watches for Summertime Fun

What do Alpina, Blancpain, Breitling, Longines, Omega, Oris, Rolex and Tudor have in common? Of course, they’re all hoping to conquer the very limited and therefore precious space on your wrist, but they also have all released watches this year that are ideal for sun, fun, and watersport. Scroll down to see my selections for summertime tag heuer replica watches.

Alpina Seastrong Diver 300 Chronograph BigDate

A 44-mm steel chronograph, water-resistant to 300 meters and equipped with a Ronda quartz caliber with big date indication ($1,295).

Alpina Seastrong Diver 300 Chronograph BigDate

 

Blancpain Ocean Commitment Bathyscaphe Chronographe Flyback

43.6-mm titanium case, water-resistant to 300 meters, equipped with Blancpain’s in-house caliber F385 ($20,200; click here for a review of this watch)

Blancpain_Ocean-Commitment-Bathyscaphe-Chronographe-Flyback-560

 

 

Breitling Superocean II 44 mm

The dial color is “mariner blue.” The 44-mm steel case is water-resistant to 1,000 meters and the watch is equipped with a COSC chronometer-certified ETA 2824-2 caliber. If this size is too big for you, the watch is also available in a 42-mm version (prices start at $3,650 for rubber-strap model; click here for more info on the Superoceran II collection and here for a review).

Breitling Superocean II 44 with mariner blue dial

 

 

Longines Heritage Diver 1967

A replica of a 1967  Longines timepiece, it looks like the original one, but everything is simply done better in this modern version. Water-resistant to 300 meters, the watch is equipped with an ETA A08.L01 chronograph caliber; prices start at $3,100.

Longines Heritage Diver

Omega Seamaster Diver 300m ‘ETNZ’ Chrono

For the renewal of its partnership with the Emirates Team New Zealand in the America’s Cup, Omega launched this chronograph, with a 44-mm  titanium case and 300-meter water resistance. The watch is equipped with the Omega co-axial caliber 3330 (6,500 CHF; click here for a review).

Omega Seamaster Diver 300m ‘ETNZ’ Chrono

Oris Divers Sixty-Five

A replica of a 1965 divers’ watch from Oris. Today, this 40-mm steel watch is water-resistant to 100 meters and equipped with a Sellita SW200-1 caliber ($1,650).

Oris Divers Sixty-Five

 

 

Rolex Yacht-Master 40

A 40-mm Everose-gold cheap replica watch with a black ceramic bezel, water-resistant to 100 meters, equipped with a high-tech rubber strap and Rolex caliber 3135. The Yacht-Master 37 will be priced at $22,000; the Yacht-Master 40, at $24,950. Click here to read WatchTime’s report on the watch from Baselworld 2015.

Rolex Yacht-Master 40

Tudor Pelagos Black

This new dive watch from Tudor, in a 42-mm titanium case water-resistant to 500 meters, is equipped with the brand’s new in-house Caliber MT5612. The watch comes with a rubber and titanium strap ($4,400).

Tudor Pelagos Black

Detroit-Based Shinola Releases New Limited-Edition Runwell Watches

Just in time for Father’s Day, the Detroit-based watch brand Shinola, which we profiled in the December 2012 issue of WatchTime, will be rolling out new styles of its Runwell high quality replica watch, a limited edition that proved to be a hit for the newly launched brand, selling out within a week on its website. Tomorrow, June 7th, Shinola will launch several new dial and strap combinations in different colors, three of which are pictured below.

In addition to watches, Shinola also sells leather accessories, journals with paper from sustainable forests, and handmade bicycles, all crafted in Detroit. More info on these products, along with all of Shinola’s new Runwell watches, can be found at shinola.com.

shinolablacksteel

shinolablue2

shinolagreen

How To Buy Vintage Replica Watches Online?

There are two very important questions to consider when it comes to buying vintage replica watches online:

• Can you and do you trust the seller of the watch?

Does the seller has a good reputation when it comes to selling vintage cheap  replica watches? Investigate! There are enough forums, Facebook groups and blogs out there that might have mentioned the seller in a positive — or negative — manner. Although it might sound cliché, also learn to trust your gut feelings. If the purchase doesn’t feel good or legit, let it go, and rest assured that another nice vintage piece will come along.

• Have you gained as much knowledge as you can on the watch you want to buy?

Reading WatchTime and WatchTime.com is always an excellent source of info (of course)! But also take a look at other partner watch blogs like Watch-Insider, Fratello Watches and so on. There is quite a bit of coverage out there on vintage watches. Google is your best friend if you’re just starting out. Sometimes you will find relatively small websites that specialize in just one brand or even one model, and these can be gems. An example is this website on vintage Omega Constellation watches. A truly amazing source of information, and all for free. And along with websites, we also have these old-fashioned things called books. Don’t forget about those.

Vintage Omega Constellation watches

The publisher Mondani has done a good job on documenting Rolex watches, but the recently released book on Speedmaster watches (by WatchPrint), Moonwatch Only sets new standards. Books such as these may seem expensive, but they can prevent you from making mistakes that will cost you a fortune later. Read here why you should invest in a good book on discount fake watches. In the WatchTime Shop, you will find a selection of available titles that might be of use as well. Another interesting source of information are the auction-house websites and catalogs.

Rolex watches book

Beyond all that, there are a few other things to consider, some of which I addressed in my article on pre-owned watches in general. On the next page, I will address them specifically for vintage watches:

Service history

Don’t expect invoices from the 1950s and 1960s to be included in the sale. I assume your parents or grandparents don’t have these anymore either, do they? It is important that a vintage watch is technically in good working order. If not, you can go through hell with regards to the availability (and prices!) of spare parts. It can be a long road. I had to wait for over a year on a silly movement part for one of my 1950s Omegas. Some watchmakers are able to reproduce the parts themselves, or reuse something from another movement. It would be best if the watch is serviced at the manufacture, but having receipts from a good watchmaker will also do the job — as long as there is some kind of proof that the watch has been taken care of.

Longines Vintage watch

Box and papers

If a watch is 30 or 40 years old, it is quite common that its original boxes and manuals are gone. If possible, make sure to get the correct box for your watch. It should match the actual watch or at least be period-correct. Through the years, some watch brands used different boxes for their watches. Some brands can supply you with information on the correct boxes and manuals.

One more topic I would mention is “provenance.” Be very careful when a watch seller offers you items that speak to a watch’s provenance in order to prove to you that it is authentic. These may include photos of people wearing the high quality replica watch to napkins with the signature of the first owner. I’m not joking here, unfortunately. Only real provenance counts. Acceptable items include invoices with mention of the correct serial number and/or movement number and the work performed on the watch, as well as original, stamped papers and warranty cards. Do not pay a premium for items that look fishy or have the slightest signs of being fabricated to make a sale.

Vintage Tudor watch

So what are the best places to find some of these beautiful timepieces? I’m glad you asked. Keep reading.

I have left out one of the most obvious sources — watch auctions — as I have covered that topic in detail elsewhere previously.

• Watch Dealers

Yes, this is another obvious one. Many of these have websites where they list their stock, or use websites like Chrono24 to display their stock. Either way, if they don’t have a website and are not close to you to visit, it becomes troublesome. Make sure to get into a daily or weekly routine in which you visit the websites of these watch sellers so you won’t miss out on the “incoming” watches they have. There are some awesome websites, such as www.subgmt.com, which specialize in specific brands and have a great reputation. Make sure to bookmark them and work your way through them. Descriptions and good(repeat: good) photos are key. I’d rather see a picture that doesn’t have the best composition, or beautiful surroundings, but instead shows all the minor details and essentially the watch “as is.” Nowadays, some dealers are nowadays also show their stock on Instagram, so make sure to follow them there, too.

Vintage watches on table

Tudor Submariner

If you know thing or two about watches you’ve probably heard about Tudor by now. You might also be aware of the fact that Tudor and Rolex have to do something with each other. Rolex founder Hans Wilsdorf founded Tudor as daughter company of the big crown. One of the daughter companies I should say, there were more brands in the Rolex stable.

Tudor was meant to be able to offer a cheaper watch, but with the same high quality as its big brother. In many cases, only the wording on the dial and the movements that Tudor used were different to those from Rolex. Some collections were really similar, such as the Submariner. With this article about the Tudor Submariner I’d like to give you an overview of the different models of that collection over the years.

People tend to look at Tudor Submariners as the underdogs, the poor man’s Rolex Submariner watch. However, this is far from the truth. Tudor was, and still is, a very interesting brand to collectors of both new and vintage AAA grade swiss replica watches. They surprise us with great watches year after year as we have seen this a few months ago during BaselWorld as well. With their Heritage collection Tudor makes vintage themed watches that belong to the coolest on the market. So I think it is only fair of us to have a look at the long and interesting history of Tudor Submariners and shed some light on the different models and references, as we did a while ago with the Rolex Submariners.

Tudor Submariner - Military issued model from their own collection

A bit of Tudor history

Hans Wilsdorf, the founder of Rolex, and later Tudor, acquired the brand in 1926. A few years passed and in the early years of the 1930’s the first Tudor watches were brought to the market. At the end of the 1930’s the World War II started and the industry was occupied with everything else but expanding. One year after the war, Mr Wilsdorf founded the Tudor company as we know it today, on the 6th of March 1946. He envisioned Tudor as a second brand next to Rolex and used the already present technical advantages on his new second line of watches.

Birth of the Tudor Submariner

The first Submariner from Rolex and its little Tudor brother were both developed at the same time. Of course, Rolex had to come out first with this new diver’s watch. Please bear in mind that at this point, Rolex had to go first simply because of the fact that they were the first brand and Tudor was the newcomer within Wilsdorf’s businesses. The first Rolex Submariners (the company launched 3 different models at the same time: the ref. 6200, 6204 and 6205) were introduced in 1953 and a few months later, in 1954, the Tudor Submariner followed. This model was given the reference number 7922 and it was almost identical to the Rolex Submariner. The cheap replica watch set the major design elements for future Tudor Submariner models, it had a self-winding movement of course (Fleurier caliber 390) and water resistant to 100 meters.

Tudor Submariner 7922 as seen in Antiquorum's site (www.antiquorum.com)

The watch that never existed

This reference was only short lived as it was quickly followed-up by the Tudor Submariner ref. 7923. This model is so rare that for a long time, people did not even believe it ever existed. They called the reference anything between a prototype and frankenwatch. While the 7922 had an automatic movement this new reference had a manual-wind movement (caliber 1156-1188). It is the only manual movement used in the Tudor Submariner collection. The design was very similar to the predecessor but not 100% identical. The dial for example, is simpler, there is no depth-marking on it; it actually bears resemblance to the Rolex 6205. Due to the manual-wind movement, the case of the perfect clone watch was thinner and lighter, nothing remotely similar to today’s Tudor dive watches. More about those later.

Tudor Submariner 7924

Like the 7922 and the 7923, the 7924 Tudor Submariner reference had a very short production run. Because of this we do not have certain information about some of the details of this watch. The Tudor Submariner 7924 was most likely produced in or around 1958 and it had a thicker crystal compared to its predecessors. It was water resistant to 200 meters.

The rare and interesting Tudor Submariner 7924

The classic Tudor Submariner

In 1960, Tudor brought the 4th reference to the market with the Tudor Submariner 7928. This is – in my opinion – one of the most classic looking Tudor Submariner watches in their time line (very similar to the Rolex Submariner 5512 and 5513 references). Whereas the previous two references were smaller in size (roughly 37mm) this watch was bigger (39mm) and much more rugged. The bezel changed to the riveted version where the first 15 minutes are also marked. The watch was very popular due to the significantly lower price than a Rolex Submariner. Unlike the Rolex Submariner, this movement was not chronometer certified. It was an automatic movement though; the Fleurier 390. It had a pretty long production run, from 1960 to around 1968.

Tudor Submariner 7928

The 2nd generation

The next two Tudor Submariner references were milestones in the history of the collection in many ways. The company stopped using the caliber 390 supplied by Fleurier and changed to ETA’s 2483 movement for the new references 7016 (and later 7021) around 1968-1969. Rumor has it that the new type of hands were also introduced with this model – they are called snowflake by collectors – were requested by the French Navy (Marine Nationale Francé). The company had to come up with a variation that would be easier to see under water. Tudor changed the design and it determined the look of their Submariner models for the coming years. Not only the hands were changed, the indexes became square (previous ones were round), and the dial was now also available in blue. The case and bezel stayed the same as it was on the Tudor Submariner 7928. Shortly after the introduction of the reference 7016, Tudor introduced the Tudor Submariner reference 7021, which was identical to the previous model but had a date feature at 3 o’clock. Characteristic of these models is the fact that many models have damaged dials. In many cases the lacquered dial started to flake or bubble up after a while due to the combination of lousy quality of manufacture and lack of proper care.

Tudor Submariner 7016/0

Tudor Submariner 9401

In 1975, the Tudor Submariner 9401 was introduced (and 9411 again for the date version). This version was also available in both black and blue.  As a matter of fact, this blue version was the one the afore mentioned French Navy bought and supplied to their divers. Production under various variations of these references ran from 1975 until around 1983. The movement Tudor used was still supplied by ETA, using their own caliber numbers (caliber 2776 and caliber 2784 for the date version). The movements were slightly modified by Tudor.

Tudor Submariner 94110 and 94010

Transitional Tudor Submariner

The 76100 was a reference Tudor collectors often call a transitional model. It seems that the watch was produced roughly at the same time as the 94110 so technically it is identical to that watch. However upon closer inspection we realize that this has different hands than the 94110. Production of the 76100 can be placed around 1984, which was a great year to be born, it could be a cool, rare and pretty interesting watch to celebrate one’s year of birth. Quite the conversation starter in my opinion. Image below is a beautiful 76100 as seen on Thirtyfivemill.

Tudor Submariner 76100-2-800 (photo by thirtyfivemill.com)

Last Generation

The Tudor Submariner 79000 series of reference (79090, 79190) was the 3rd and last generation of Tudor’s classic Submariner collection. They were introduced by the brand in the 1980’s and in – different variation – ran until 1999. The tag heuer replica watches had a different dial version than the previous ones; the indexes at 9 and 6o’clock were changed from square to triangle, the color variation was once again extended with the burgundy color, and the date became permanent. The movement was ETA’s solid 2824-2. While the previous models had snowflake hands for this reference the hands are already so-called Mercedes hands, the ones you see on Rolex as well of course.

The Tudor Submariner Aftermath

After the 79000 series Tudor did not continue the production of the Submariner collection. Of course, there have been many other references connected to Tudor Submariner like the mini Sub produced for the Asian market, or the lady Sub for the female watch lover. When it comes to the original simple Tudor Submariner watch, the above references are the backbone of the collection. Obviously, the 79000 series is not considered vintage yet and they are still readily available for cheap money on various on-line watch market paces like Chrono24. As written in the introduction, I love the Heritage models by Tudor, especially the Tudor Blackbay and the Pelagos collections. They are a great combination of past and present, tradition and innovation.  Not to mention that with their simple design, they are surely becoming future classics. Until then, I’ll have any of the vintage ones, please!

Below an image of the Tudor Heritage Black Bay in Midnight Blue, just an awesome reinterpretation of the coolest vintage Tudor Subs.

Tudor Black Bay in Midnight Blue

Discover the Most Dangerous Dive Watch

A couple of weeks ago, the watch brand Artya presented a fold-out knife strap buckle for its eccentric range of waterproof replica watches sale (which the brand’s own representatives refer to as “crazy projects,” occasionally). The idea instantly reminded me of an unfortunately much more serious attempt at bringing together two iconic Swiss products: the Safari dive watch from the 1970s. And even though it was the Victorinox Swiss Army brand (which happens to be celebrating its 25th anniversary of making Victorinox Swiss Army watches this year) that supplied the blade, it is not Victorinox that would today have to answer the justified question, “What were you thinking?!” but rather the defunct (since 1979) watch company, Sicura. Sure, it certainly is never a bad idea for a diver to carry a knife, but how could anyone ever think of integrating such a small blade into a top quality replica watch case? Especially on the wrong side of the case?

On the other hand, if Sicura had not created the Safari watch, we wouldn’t have been able to be astonish you with what is probably the most dangerous dive watch ever made — not to mention one of the few watches that one should never wear when dealing with the TSA.

Sicura Safari watch with fold-out Victorinox knife

Speedy Tuesday – The Very Rare Replica Omega Speedmaster 105.002 Watch

It’s Speedy Tuesday! This week we have a contribution from Ashley Budgen (co-owner and founder of the popular Australian based omegaforums.net website) about his very rare Omega Speedmaster reference 105.002. A straight-lugged Speedmaster from 1962 – only 1 year in production – and therefore one of the rarest references. Ashley bought one last year and shares his story with you.

I had actually been looking for a pre-pro, straight lug Speedmaster for quite some time, either an ST105.003 or a middle to later series Speedmaster CK2998.  As all Omega (Lemania based) caliber 321 Speedmaster fans know, the earlier the best replica watches, the harder it is to find an all original example, and for this reason I’d waited patiently for something I really liked to come along.  I had not actually considered the ST105.002, and didn’t really know much about the reference, only that it was an odd duck transitional model produced only for part of the year in 1962 and came in a lot of varieties for a single year reference.

a_OF21442I was tipped off about this particular piece by one of the moderators on Omegaforums, by the nickname MSNWatch, and looking over the photos in depth it became apparent this was an all original “raw” watch, not yet touched by dealers.  The high quality replica watches was made at the very end of ST105.002-62 production, with a serial number in the 20.52 million range which is why unlike earlier 105.002s with alpha hands, this watch was fitted with stick hands from the factory, making it among the very first Speedmasters to feature them.

While the stick hands make these late Speedmaster 105.002 watches appear similar to the Speedmaster reference 105.003 that replaced them, they are very different watches.  The 105.002 shares the same smaller case as the CK2998 references, and like the 2998 carries a radium dial (with no Ts either side of Swiss Made) unlike the later ST105.003 which uses a tritium dial.  It also features smaller pushers than 105.003s and the CK2998’s polished silver tension ring, which gives a real depth to the dial.

ebay2The watch came on its original 7912 bracelet with number 6 endlinks, however having hairy wrists, as much as I liked how it looked and the cool factor of the 7912, the bracelet drove me mad with its pinching and hair pulling until I put it in its box and fitted a Horween Shell Cordovan leather strap in 19mm which fits the style and feel of the early Cal 321 Speedmasters perfectly.  I had a sympathetic restoration performed by one of our watchmaker members, Stefan in the UK.  A full movement overhaul, replacement crystal, tension ring and a modified Railmaster CK2914 crown replacing the generic crown it came with finished the job.

a_OF21507

a_OF21512I’m still keen to eventually find myself an alpha hand equipped reference CK2998, the earlier the better, but the ST105.002-62 has really grown on me in its obscurity.  I’ve always liked top quality replica watches that are unusual or a bit out of the ordinary and for that reason I think this Speedmaster will always have a place in my collection.

Panerai classic replica watch

Panerai’s latest version of its Radiomir 1940 3 Days Ceramica, this week’s Watch to Watch, blends history and modernity — with a contemporary, matte-black ceramic case and a minimalist dial inspired by the brand’s history as a supplier of timepieces to the Royal Italian Navy.

The material used in the case of the Panerai Radiomir 1940 3 Days Ceramica is synthesized from Zirconium Oxide. This type of ceramic scores higher than the more commonly used steel in areas such as hardness, lightness, and resistance to scratches, corrosive elements and high temperatures. The case measures a generous 48 mm in diameter and boasts a water resistance of 100 meters — as most would hope for and expect in a cheap replica watch whose historical predecessor was made for military divers.

Panerai PAM577 - front

The black dial is constructed in Panerai’s hallmark “sandwich” style, comprised of two superimposed plates with a layer of luminous material between them, a design the company started using way back in the late 1930s. The hours are marked by simple bar and dot indices, all coated (along with the hour and minute hands) with an ecru-colored Super-LumiNova that gives them a somewhat martial-looking “khaki” glow in low light (or deep water). The dial’s other highlight is a subtle relief image of the Silura a Lenta Corsa (“human torpedo”), a reference to the 1930s Italian naval commandos that wore the early Panerai watches on their missions.

Panerai PAM577 - angle

Panerai PAM577 - side

The watch is powered by an in-house movement, Panerai’s manual-wind P.3000, which an be ogled through a large polished sapphire window in the caseback, which is made of titanium. The movement measures a stately 161⁄2 lignes, or about 37.22 mm – a size that is not only true to the Panerai high quality replica watches of old but also a perfect fit for the large case. Among its attributes and flourishes are wide, brush-finished bridges covering the greater part of the wheelwork, an uncommonly large balance wheel (13.2 mm in diameter), and two spring barrels that store a power reserve of three days. The P.3000 movement is also equipped device for rapidly adjusting the time, which enables the hour hand to move in jumps of one hour forward or backward, without interfering with the minute hand.

Panerai PAM577 - back

The Panerai Radiomir 1940 3 Days Ceramica (Reference PAM00577, for all you Paneristi out there) comes on a strap of brown, untreated leather, with hand-sewn contrast stitching, and fastened by a trapezoidal buckle, which, like the caseback, is made of non-allergenic titanium with DLC (diamond- like carbon) coating that matches the hue of the case. Its retail price is $11,200.

Fratello Classics: 3 Watches for the Blind

A recently published article on the BBC website caught my attention with its depiction of a wristwatch for blind people. The watch pictured in the article is the Bradley Timepiece, named after a Paralympic gold medalist, Brad Snyder, who lost his sight in Afghanistan.

To be honest, when I first saw the picture of the watch first (before I clicked on the link to the article) I thought it was a “design” timepiece. It turns out I wasn’t far off, as it has been nominated for the Designs of the Year contest at London’s Design Museum.

However, the watch’s most important task is to tell time for those with limited – or no – vision. That started me thinking about other alternatives – ones that were still wristwatches – to tell time when one doesn’t have enough vision to use a normal watch. I found high quality replica watches that had a crystal that could flip open so the wearer could actually feel the hands to tell time, but those were from long ago. I also know about a Breitling Aerospace watch that has a (digital) minute repeater that can be used either in the dark or when the wearer has limited or no vision.  There are also watches that will literally “tell” you the time in an electronic voice. Not too long ago, I walked past a bus station in the village where I live and saw a man who was probably in his late 80s carrying a nightstand clock and holding it very close to his eyes so he could read the time. It reminded me a bit of Flavor Flav’s giant-clock gimmick from the 1980s and ’90s.

Telltime talking watch

Reizen Braille watch

Briefly mentioned in the introduction,the Bradley is a tactile timepiece designed and produced by EONE using Kickstarter for (crowd)funding. It is a titanium watch (with stainless steel caseback) that uses a Swiss quartz movement. This watch measures 40 mm in diameter and is 11.5 mm thick. It comes either on a stainless steel mesh bracelet or one of several colorful fabric straps. The wearer of the cheap replica watch can read the time by feeling the position of the two ball rings: one for the hours and one for the minutes. The hour markers are raised so you can exactly feel where the hour and minute ball rings are located. It’s an incredibly clever solution and a wonderful design. (Let’s face it; some of the timepieces on this list are hideous.) The Bradley is now ready for pre-ordering (ships in June), for $195.

The Bradley Timepieces

Most of the time, watches that allow you to “feel” the time have a crystal that can be opened and a pair of sturdy hands underneath that can be gently touched to read the time. A quick online search  taught me that most of them are plain ugly. Being blind or visually impaired does not mean one does not care what his or her watch looks like. The same holds true for watches with a voice that tells time. Some of them look like Michael Knight’s watch from the 1980s TV series “Knight Rider.” To be honest, it seems that EONE filled a niche in the market with its watches for the blind. From what I understood, some people with perfect sight have ordered this top quality replica watch simply because it looks nice and it enables one to subtly read the time without being rude while in a boring meeting or some similar situation.

 

Bradley watches

The Aerospace by Breitling is also a good alternative, with its minute repeater functionality. In fact, any minute repeater would do the trick. However, keep in mind that circumstances are not always ideal to listen to the sound. What if you are in a crowded public place? Or a noisy train? Recently, on our blog Fratellowatches.com, we had a contribution from Prof. Dr. Jan Adriaanse of the Leiden University in The Netherlands, discussing the market for smartwatches . He talks about the smartwatch being a big opportunity for the Swiss manufacturers and writes, “Smartwatches are here to improve our lives. They are here to measure our well-being. In fact, they are here to extend and save our lives. They are here to monitor our heart rate, blood pressure, and to detect other potential health threats. “

Whether or not you agree with him, I can imagine the following:

– A smartwatch that is also of use for the blind (and perhaps supportive of other types of handicaps)

– A watch for the blind developed by Swiss watchmakers with the same quality and aesthetics as their traditional timepieces;

Brand to replica Watch: Aerowatch and the Aerowatch Renaissance Orange Tornado

Aerowatch is a small brand with a big history. At Baselworld 2015, the Jura-based brand debuted the Renaissance Orange Tornado, a new skeletonized watch with bright accents on the dial. It’s worth taking a look at both where this watch company comes from and what it’s doing today. Here’s the Aerowatch story behind the Renaissance Orange Tornado.

Aerowatch isn’t the most familiar name in the buy replica watches world, but it has the kind of solid Swiss heritage that many small independent brands would do anything for. Originally founded in La Chaux-de-Fonds in 1910, Aerowatch aspired to being a watchmaker for the future. As the name suggests, the brand had its eye on an English-speaking international market, and during the golden age of flight it wanted to be the first name in aviation-themed timepieces.

Aerowatch-Historical Ad 560

But the path forward was not so easy. The brand moved repeatedly, first to Fleurier, then to Neuchâtel. Throughout, it remained a family-run business. When Maxime Crevoisier took over the company from its original owners in 1942, he set it on its course as a specialist in pocketwatches and pendant swiss replica watches for men and women.

He and his son Georges built up a distribution network in more than 30 countries. The business continued along through the following decades. In 2001 the Crevoisiers sold Aerowatch to Denis Bolzli, who now runs the company with his two sons. It is based in Saignelégier in the Swiss Jura, close to the French border.

Aerowatch Headquarters 560

A key thing to know about the brand is that Aerowatch only entered the wristwatch market very recently. Throughout the 20th century it remained a pocketwatch company. It was not until 2004 that the brand began to work on original wristwatches with fine Swiss movements. Today it has a range of models for men and women, with quartz and mechanical calibers.

An important moment for the brand was 2009, when it launched its first Grandes Squelettes models. Skeletonized models are always a pleasure to gaze into, but all the more so when the movements they reveal have some history to them. That’s definitely the case with Aerowatch’s Grandes Squelettes: they’re powered by hand-wound Unitas movements, which have a heritage dating back to the 1950s.

 

Aerowatch Orange Tornado soldier 560The Renaissance Orange Tornado uses a skeletonized bridge design. It’s built off of concentric circles that emanate outwards from the balance, located at 8 o’clock. (This subtle asymmetry was also used in the Black Tornado, which was introduced several years ago; other Grandes Squelettes models have different designs.) Two bright orange hands with luminous coating are mounted at the center; a seconds subdial is at 6 o’clock. Simple, luminous hour markings are found around the perimeter of the dial, making for easy reading. The small seconds display has no markers, but the orange hand should make its position easy to spot nonetheless.

One real treat in looking at the Renaissance Orange Tornado is that its barrel is open for view. As you wind the movement via the crown, you can see the mainspring contract. And as it winds down over the course of 46 hours, you’ll be able to monitor the remaining power just by glancing at it.

Aerowatch Orange Tornado mainspring CU 560

The aaa grade swiss replica watch uses a Unitas 6498 movement, a 16 1/2-ligne manual caliber. Now owned by ETA (and sometimes known as the ETA 6498), it runs in 17 jewels and has a pocketwatch-style power reserve of 18,000 vph. The movement has been skeletonized, decorated, and chamfered by hand. The Renaissance Orange Tornado is sizable: it has a 45-mm diameter. Its case is made of polished stainless steel with a black PVD coating. The ring around the dial is matte black with orange markings for the hour indexes. The front sapphire crystal is domed. The watch is water resistant to 50 meters.

Aerowatch Orange Tornado back 560

Available at Aerowatch retailers since March, the Renaissance Orange Tornado costs $2,580. It comes on a black leather strap with orange overstitching and has a steel folding clasp that’s coated in black PVD.